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THE E631 INGREDIENT

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E631: THE PORK INGREDIENT IN THE HARAAM CHIPS YOU DEVOUR

The following is a faithful reproduction of an article which should be ample for preventing you from devouring the chips which SANHA, MJC and the other haraam scoundrel entities have halaalized. 

Please see below a very interesting article regarding a very very common food additive E631 flavour enhancer. The important point to note here in the article is the line that states, 'You could try writing to manufacturers to ask exactly where it comes from. There’s no guarantee that you’ll get a definitive answer'. I have personally for the last 2 weeks been trying to get a clear answer on some similar ingredients from the company Simba (who has SANHA approval) and get no joy, they keep beating around the bush and simply dont give straight answers. Perhaps they have something to hide.

 

QUESTION

Can you tell me about the source of flavour additive E631 which is used in some potato chips/crisps. I cannot tell from anything I've read whether it comes from pig's fat, another animal - or indeed sardine oil? It's important to many people to avoid products extracted from pigs.

ANSWER

Thanks for sending in your question. The E number known as E631 (or sodium inosinate) is an additive that is used in many products to act as a flavour enhancer and make foods taste good. As well as enhancing other flavours, it’s used frequently in products such as potato crisps as it also helps to reduce the amount of salt needed (and reducing salt intake has become quite a big health concern in recent years, with manufacturers vying to get their levels of salt in products down).

 

Sodium inosinate comes from inosinic acid, an acid that is naturally found in a variety of animals, such as pigs or fish, such as sardines. In some cases it can also be produced from bacterially fermenting some sugars.

 

As far as commercial use goes, most manufacturers do source their E631 from animals and fish, whilst a few may use the fermentation method. The tricky bit is if you want to specifically avoid E631 that comes from pork, as most products will not say on their ingredients list exactly where it comes from.

 

You could try writing to manufacturers to ask exactly where it comes from. There’s no guarantee that you’ll get a definitive answer, but it’s always worth a try and, you never know, some might be receptive and willing to give you the facts. However, if it’s an issue that really concerns you and you don’t want to find yourself unknowingly consuming food with E631 sourced from pigs, probably the best move is to avoid the products completely.

 

It’s hard work sometimes trying to avoid these pesky E numbers, especially with so many hidden in the foods and drinks we enjoy, but if you really do need or want to avoid certain numbers, scouring the ingredients lists before you buy products is the best way of ensuring you’re not getting more than you bargained for.

 

We realise the importance for many people of avoiding products extracted from pigs, which is why we’ve published articles such as this one on - E numbers not suitable for a Halal diet - if you’re looking to avoid other E numbers with links to pork products, then you may find this to be a useful read.

 

http://www.exploreenumbers.co.uk

6 Sha’baan 1440 - 12 April 2019

Last Updated on Monday, 29 April 2019 15:16  

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